Quagmire

Quagmire (noun)

: an area of soft, wet ground
: a situation that is hard to deal with or get out of : a situation that is full of problems

When choosing which word to use for “Q” day on the A to Z Challenge, I ran into a quagmire. No, I didn’t fall into an area of soft, wet ground while thinking. My difficult situation was choosing between Quality and Quagmire. It really wasn’t that hard to deal with, I just wanted to let everyone know Quality was a close, close second and something that I feel is important in writing.

Back to quagmire and our science to science fiction theme. Science is constantly presenting situations that are full of problems that need to be resolved. That’s kind of the nature of science. Following a scientific study from beginning to end can be a truly enlightening experience. Understanding the ins and outs of the inner workings of nature is heavy stuff.

The interactions of characters and situations in a science fiction story can work in a similar fashion. The imagination and creativity of the author is the engine that drives the creation of situations and the resolutions required. But I think it is also the imagination and creativity of the reader that the author is trying to tap.

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This entry was posted in A to Z Challenge, Character Development, Fantasy, Mystery, Science, Science Fiction and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Quagmire

  1. Quagmire is a great word for all writers as we need conflict to keep the story flowing. I had always thought of the word as apolitical one to describe wars…. you gave it a whole new light for me thanks ! And yes QUALITY is very important #AtoZchallenge ☮Peace ☮ ღ ONE ℒℴνℯ ღ ☼ Light ☼ visiting from http://4covert2overt.blogspot.com/

  2. Joachim Boaz says:

    “But I think it is also the imagination and creativity of the reader that the author is trying to tap.” — this applies to literature as well…

    • kondorkyinia says:

      Agreed. I wonder how many people get so deep into the writing they forget that the reader plays a role in their story as well. Keep a net around the plot but some ebb and flow can do nicely.

      Thanks for stopping by and look forward to reading your stuff as well!

  3. Joachim Boaz says:

    Did you know that “quag” by itself is also a word? And it means the same thing…

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